Dad

Teens Hunger For Digital Media

Teens Hunger For Digital Media

I am going to take a brief plunge into Teens Hunger For Digital Media consumption today. What spurred me to do so was a visit to a friend’s house for dinner recently. It was after dinner we were all sitting around downstairs and I could hear a noise coming from upstairs. Which I described at the time as perhaps a video game or more particularly it sounded to me like a dinosaur game. My query to the other adults got some odd looks as I guess they could not hear it and the teenager that was downstairs with us at the time did not give me any information to work from. I left it, and the night went on, then when things went quiet again later I could hear the noise quite clearly again. I had been upstairs in between hearing the noise, to check on our toddler Keisha who was playing with Lego blocks. Although I did not notice at the time when hearing the noise again later I clicked that no computer games that I knew of were being played on the main TV upstairs. So when I ask the question again and one of the other teenagers living there was downstairs with us group of adults. I was finally relieved of my confusion for what was producing the confusing background noise. It turned out that it was a Skype call between a bunch of teenage friends, and that day just leave it running pretty much whenever they are home. The teenage resident went on to say that it even got left on at times when that sister resident wasn’t even home or had fallen asleep for the night. This blew my mind and made me ask if they had unlimited data.

Streaming aside, my thoughts went to the privacy side, of having homes all linked up through audio and visual at all hours of the day and night. I am showing my age here but it is such a vast difference from when I was a teenager and a majority of us didn’t even own a mobile phone.

Out of intrigue I did some research and interestingly enough kids of today actually watch more YouTube and Netflix than traditional TV.  Teens spent 65 percent of their time watching Netflix and YouTube, compared to just 26 percent of their time watching “traditional TV.” Although Netflix is clearly dominating teen viewing habits at 38 percent, according to a study by Piper Jaffray.

Amazon Prime membership has also grown among teens (although probably paid for by their parents) in each of the past five surveys, and Piper Jaffray now estimates that 51 percent of teens surveyed are now a member (or their parents are). Amazon Prime for those who do not know provides unlimited streaming of movies and TV shows with Prime Video, and the ability to borrow books from the Kindle store

Teens now spend up to nine hours a day on social platforms, while 30% of all time spent online is now allocated to social media interaction. And the majority of that time is on mobile – 60% of social media time spent is facilitated by a mobile device(socialmediatoday.com)

It is definitely a changing world and vastly different to when I was growing up. What’s your thoughts on our love of digital and social media? Please I would love to know your thoughts in the comments section. If you enjoyed this read, please feel free to share.

This Article was also posted on Digital Bloggers

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Ryan Billy Tate

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Employment

My Cray Days

My Cray Days

During my teenage years I was lucky enough to often travel a few hours North of where we live to stay in a friends shack. Every school holidays we used to fill up their big F250 truck with clothes and supplies and venture up for two weeks of fishing, off road motorbike riding, shooting guns at targets and eating big cooked breakfasts every morning… and odd can of beer too!
As you could imagine we would excitedly look forward to these trips, and the fact that we were not staying in luxury accommodation added to the character of these trips.
Whilst out fishing off the boat I used to see numerous big cray fishing boats motor past with deckies (deck hands) wearing only board shorts in the warm weather, utilizing the water hammering through the deck hose to cool off.  I would envy them and always said to Dennis, the father of the friends we was staying with, “If a job ever came up, doing that, I wanted in!”
Sure enough, not long out of school and working in a hospitality job at a ‘Hard Rock Cafe’ style Diner called ‘Jimmy Deans Diner’ I got a phone call. A deckhand job had come up on a cray fishing boat but I needed to get my butt up there immediately. I can confidently say I did not know what I was getting myself into. My parents always supported me no matter what I desired to do and in that vein my father dropped everything and drove me 4 hours North to a location further up the coast to where we used to holiday. Similar style accommodation in that they were just sheet metal and wood shacks with no permanent services.  I remember finally finding the turn off to what would be my new bosses home. His name was Mick Foster and his wife, at the time, who was half his age was Vanessa. They were the only full timers in Sandy Bay. The other shacks were simply used for holidays, often by farmers that lived inland from there, & would sometimes fly in for the weekend on small helicopters.
Mick had taken the opportunity at the time, losing his Deckie, to pull all of the cray fishing pots out of the water and give them some TLC. That included fixing any battens that had snapped, replacing ropes and rubbing a steel brush over them to get rid of any build up algae. Looking back it was probably a good way to ease into what life was going to be like there, rather than getting straight into the fishing which was a 5 am starts, 7 days a week for 7 months. I was lucky enough to score my own shack several bays down from Mick & Vanessa’s. I was in Docs Bay and the only full timer also. The beach shack that I had been allowed to stay in was nowhere near as flash as Mick’s. I was in a one bedroom place which was run by a generator. I had no fridge, I had an ice box and used to buy massive blocks of ice in a hessian style bag, off the truck that would collect the catch each afternoon. I used to ride my push bike home with it slung over my shoulder, with melted cold water running down my backside. I had rain water however showering entailed using a bucket shower and to flush the toilet I would venture down to the ocean to fill a bucket of water to pour down the loo. I remember one afternoon venturing down to the water line with my bucket. On the trip back up to the shack with my bucket full of sea water, I heard laughing coming from one of the other shacks. Not realising I had company in the bay I had walked down not wearing any clothes!
After a few days of repairing the pots and getting acquainted with my new accommodation we got into the fishing. The bosses place was about 15 minutes away. Riding down their long limestone driveway, or entry to Sandy Bay, at 4:30am, their two dogs where well aware of my arrival & would bark constantly right up to Mick’s front door. Like clockwork he would instantly turn on all the lights, open the front door in his undies and get straight onto the task of turning on the kettle so I could make us coffee. After about 15 minutes of Mick chain smoking we would load up his rusted out ute and venture down to the waterline. Load up the dinghy with boxes of bait and jerry cans of fuel and motor out to the boat a couple hundred meters out in the middle of the bay. Once set up, we would head out to sea in the pitch black & I would start cutting mackerel in half getting ready to replace the bait that was in the pots from the previous day.
One of my fondest memories of doing this job was seeing every sunrise for 7 months straight after the madness of getting prepped for the day I would sit back for a brief moment before pulling the first line of pots. Appreciation for the light show over the land in front of me as we motored out to sea was inevitable. At that time of the day, especially in this region bring out all of the wildlife I remember copious amounts of birds flying around, turtles in the water dolphins, flying fish, you name it. This region really was inundated with huge amounts of wildlife.
It wasn’t just from above the waterline I would see the wildlife either. Having a scuba diver ticket is a prerequisite for a job as a deckhand on the cray boats. I had attained my ticket previously to ensure when the job came up I was ready to go. Every couple of weeks or so Mick would make me don an oxygen tank and work my way down the line (rope) to the bottom. I would dislodge pots that got stuck in a reefy hole and we were unable to winch to the surface. I thoroughly looked forward to this part of the job as I would get to see some of the sea life below the surface as well.

It also gave me an appreciation of Mick’s masterful skills to time the release of the pot at the surface. Getting it to fit within some of the tightest holes in the reef, right where all the crayfish live. One standout was an approximately 5 metre tall rough, pyramid shaped limestone formation with a hole straight down the centre similar to a volcano. Mick warned me before I went over the side of the boat that the hole down the middle may be too tight and dangerous. I should look at the bottom of this formation for a hole or cave to get access to the pot, untie the rope. Then proceed to go to the top of the pinnacle grab the line go back down the side of it and pull the pot out, re-tie for him to be able to winch to the surface. Sure enough true to his word, this is exactly what I needed to do. Getting in the cave at the bottom I could look up to the heaven’s and see the light shooting down the middle of the reef formation. The silhouette of many fish were clouding the light coming down to the sea bed. It truly was an amazing experience.

One time I did not want to jump over the side to retrieve a pot, actually I remember things getting heated between Mick and I because I refused to do so. Grumpy old Mick would not take no for an answer. The reason for my disobedience was, pulling up to the plotted position where the pot was stuck at the bottom we passed what is possibly the worst stench I have ever smelt in the air, it made the old abattoirs smell like roses! A huge turtle shell was floating on the surface and unfortunately something had eaten most it. Mick ended up winning. I backed over the side of the boat and proceeded my way down the rope to what seemed like the deepest, murkiest cray pot that was ever stuck. I can tell you that was the fastest I’ve ever dislodged a pot and got back up on deck.

During the season the fisheries department allowed big commercial boats to venture to the Abrolhos Islands for a two week period. The cray fish were in such numbers around these Islands that the fisherman and the crew make in 2 weeks what they would for the rest of the seven months season almost.

Unfortunately Mick’s boat was not large enough to journey this far. As an alternative we would travel 2 hours west of the mainland to the continental shelf where the ocean floor would just drop away too monumental depths. We tied on ropes that were triple the length that we usually ran. Each pots rope coiled on the deck, was the height of my waist.

The shelf was about 22 kilometres from the mainland and we were fishing in a 30 foot boat. We had to pick our days very carefully & go when the weather was perfect, and the surface would be like a sheet of glass. This was exciting times as we fished in the relative shallows for most of the rest of the season. One particular day, out deep, we grappled (hooked) the line & buoy to the boat winch and proceeded to bring the line in. I could see the pot deep down it was tiny & very slowly getting closer. I could see something circling and I excitedly said to Mick “there’s all fish circling the pot!” he replied “They are not fish mate!” The pot seemed to take forever to come upfrom the depths. As it got closer I realised Mick was not stiring me up. There were 8 large sharks slowly following the cray pot to the surface. I got more and more excited. These were blue sharks, an open water species often found in the deep waters around the world. The larger were 10 foot in length which excites you when you’re in the middle of the ocean & they are the third size of the boat you are in. I quickly realised however they were very mellow and as I threw the smelly old bait over the side it was not a situation of a feeding frenzy but more of a slow process of swimming past the old mackrell & inhaling it. As we would motor off to the next pots location the big sharks decended towards the depths and would do the same when we arrived at the next pot in that line. I felt very fortunate to have my SLR camera aboard. Mick who was normally a grouchy old man actually let his guard down long enough for me to try and snap some photos. He even gave me a great tip when I commented the photos probably wouldn’t turn out too well with the sharks being under the water. Mick probably being in this situation more times than I have had hot dinners instructed me to cut corner of one of the waxed bait boxes off and cut cross to stab one of the mackerel tales through. This ingenious tip enabled the heavy mackerel to float on the surface making the large sharks slightly breach on their side to get the food, setting up a fantastic photo opportunity. Unfortunately this was in the days before Digital SLR’s so I was shooting on film. My old Grandfathers hand-me-down camera had masking tape to secure it closed after the film was loaded. Unbeknown to me small amounts of light were getting into the camera so weeks later when I finally had the chance to process the film I was to find out the photos had not worked. At least I got to experience it and will keep the memories until my dying day.
Another memory which was quite a buzz  living up that way was having a buoy possibly 2 or 300 metres straight in front of my shack. At the bottom of this buoy was a hole in the reef. Once in the hole it opened into a cavern in all directions, just filled with crayfish. I could turn on a pot full of water on the gas cooker, throw on my snorkel and by the time I returned with a couple of crayfish the water had just began to boil. This was a real blessing especially as never my boss and Skipper Mick never relinquished a single cray the whole season.
I was recently reminded of these days and what was one of my one of my first jobs out of High School when I was deep in conversation with a gentleman, named Peter, that was buying a treadmill from me. He mentioned he was from a small town called Mingenew when we were on the discussion of Australian rules football. I was intrigued as he had played 400 + games in the region. The area he had spent most of his life was in similar vicinity to where I used to work on a fishing boat. The Gentleman’s brother had worked the cray or lobster industry since the mid seventies. This industry interestingly enough producers more millionaires in our state than any other industry, and his brother was no exception. A humorous part of that equation is that the Skippers making the millions of dollars do not necessarily look the part. Most have thick leather skin from the Australian sun, dress very casually and often drive rusty old cars due to all the salt in the air.
The stories these old Skippers could tell would blow most people’s minds. Peter mentioned one of the first boats his brother owned ended up capsizing leaving them stranded in the water 4 over 7 hours. The deckhand alerted Peter’s who was the skipper of the boat and Peter added that he was not allowed to skipper as he hadn’t worked up enough sea hours. The deckie’s warning went unheard and & they kept on pulling the cray or lobster pots. Not long after when coming to a halt the water that had been leaking into the hull rushed to the front of the boat. The water tipped the boat forward then rushed towards the rear of the boat instantly turning it on it’s end and beginning to sink. The deckie and skipper had no time to do anything other than jump off and cling to what they could to float. The Deckhand had cut his leg quite badly and had blood pouring out into the water making them all the more nervous. They were fishing 2 hours from the coast and luckily for them another boat had passed on its way in for the day and the deckhand on that boat alerted the skipper he had seen something in the water otherwise they would have been toast. He mentions stories of going from one of the Abrolhos Islands to another (Little Rat and Big Rat) for Sunday sessions. All the fishermen would get together and drink heavily and smoke heavily also.
 
Half way through the season I made friends with some other Deckies a few bays around from where I was staying. We often were finished fishing for the day by early afternoon. For fun we used to take the dinghy out and tow each other around skurfing (skiing with surfboards). The boys had big wacky backy trees growing at their shack, which introduced me to gardening and how to prune plants etc. Similar to the pre-requisite of having a dive ticket to get a job up there it seemed it was compulsory to drink Bundy Rum straight from the bottle also. This was an effort but I honed my skills in an attempt to fit in. I scored a puppy one day travelling to the closest town to cash my cheque. I left my wallet on top of a pinball machine in a gaming arcade filled with $1000 cash…no one had seen it when I went back!
The stories could go on all day!

If you enjoyed this article & you believe others would benefit please share.
Ryan Billy Tate

Main Blog: RyanBillyTate.com

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Automation

Four Common Mistakes Made By Affiliate Marketers

You would find it very hard to source a more profitable and gratifying way to make money online than affiliate marketing – promoting someone else’s product for a commission. Having most of the hard work done for you already allows you to focus on money-generating activities like building your list, driving traffic and obtaining sales. Affiliate marketing gives you an unlimited earning potential and has, in fact, created many internet superstars.

Of course, affiliate marketing does take skill, knowledge, and a strong determination to succeed. If you think that you will become an affiliate marketer today and be a gazillionaire tomorrow, you are sorely mistaken. However, if you are serious about building a solid business in the affiliate marketing industry and do your best to avoid some common mistakes that can derail your progress, there is no reason why you cannot do just that.

So, what exactly are the activities that you want to avoid? Below I’ll touch on some of the most common blunders that newbie affiliate marketers make so you can keep clear of them.

1.) No List

Your list is probably the most important tool you will ever have as an affiliate marketer, and yet, so many people neglect to build one. Yes, you can make one-time sales by driving traffic directly to a sales page, but what you want is to be able to make numerous commissions from each and every customer. Having a list, especially a ‘buyers list’, allows you to nurture and grow a profitable relationship with people who will look to you for information on the best products available in your niche.

2.) Commission Based Focus

Yes, it is wonderful to find products to promote that have very high commissions. In fact you can find tons of products that pay out 100% commissions, but be sure that you are only promoting excellent quality items that help your subscribers instead of only looking at your potential income from each sale. Becoming someone with a reputation of recommending inferior products only to make a sale will hurt your reputation in the long run and you will find that as time goes on, you will be making less money instead of more. Below is a link to the most valuable company, both income and self helping I have come across Link To 7 Part Video Series

3.) Being A ‘Seller’ Instead Of A ‘Helper’

Jay Baer, marketing consultant, speaker, & best-selling author said, “If you sell something, you can make a customer today. If you help someone, you can create a customer for life.” As an affiliate marketer, your job is to let the sales page do the selling and instead, be a connoisseur of expert advice and information pertaining to our niche. When you act more like an honest reviewer of products instead of a salesperson, you are more likely to gain the trust of your followers and in turn, make more money in commissions.

4.) Shiny Object Syndrome

While having several promotional products at a time is not a bad thing, it is possible to have too many irons in the fire when it comes to affiliate marketing. Be sure to have enough time and energy to focus on the things you have going on right now without getting distracted by the next big launch that is inevitably going to come along in the middle of your current campaign. Being an affiliate marketer required constant focus and self-motivation. The ability to see a marketing campaign through to its completion will be a valuable skill to you in your affiliate endeavors.

These four mistakes are common throughout the affiliate marketing industry. Make it a point to avoid these pitfalls and give yourself a more probable likelihood of being successful in your marketing endeavours.

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Business

Goals & Visualisation

Goals & Visualisation

My ideal day

I am going to cover my ideal day & my Goals & Visualisation as I was instructed to do so by my Six Figure Mentors. I awake naturally well rested at 6ish. we’re staying in a luxurious coastal private villa in Indonesia, surrounded by thick tropical gardens. My wife Anna, & our two daughters Mikayla and Keisha are still asleep. I venture to the roof which is well elevated above the breaking surf below. I spend 45 minutes stretching and doing yoga. The room is open aired, & spoilt by 365 degree views of mountains in the distance, waterfalls and lush jungle with walling crystal clear waves consistently roll in below me. I end this session with 10 minutes of meditation and visualisation.

I head downstairs and meander from the elevated villa through lush manicured gardens towards the stand alone gym at the rear of the one acre property. I slide open concertina wooden doors to the beach in front & workout for 45 minutes. A quick dip in the ocean cools me down and gets me invigorated for the day ahead. Then back up to the villa for a shower, I sneak into our bed and enjoy 20 mins of motivational audio to get in the right mindset for the day. The family are starting to wake up so we venture out to the verandah & enjoy cooked breakfast and fresh fruit with friendly service on hand. After breakfast I spend the next 30 minutes checking emails and responding to anything important. The rest of the morning we spend quality time at the villa as a family enjoying games, reading and listening to music. Around 12pm a healthy picky style lunch is bought out. Once we finish I head down to the garage and start up my Indian Scout 1133cc Cruiser style motorcycle. I ride through the balmy air to a beach near by and meet the media team to put together content. We work on still images and audio visual content & we have fun with it. We shoot a Facebook live and answer questions focusing on giving value and keeping it light yet honest. At the end we fly a drone and get some location shots to use at other times as well, which I love the creative side of.

After a couple of hours I ride back to the villa then as a family we go out shopping and enjoy an ice cream. Once back at the villa I jump online for an hour and call our ‘Not For Profit Foundation’ Manager to see how our various charityvprojects are progressing, before wrapping up the arvo with a sunset surf. I shower in our private outdoor ensuite then put on fresh clothes made of light fabric. Anna & I sit together on the verandah and enjoy a drink and cheeses for about 30 mins.

Anna, Kayla, Keisha and I sit down to a seafood dinner with like minded friends we host at the villa. We enjoy each other’s company & all have a good laugh. The guests leave at a reasonable hour. Anna & I finish the evening talking and connecting. We meditate together then enjoy intimacy before retiring and ending my ideal day.

Define your work ethic?

I can not fault my work ethic. I am now in my late 30’s and have spent my working life jumping from job to job, looking for greener pastures. I have worked as a ‘Cray/Lobster fishing Deckie’ working 7 days a week for 7 months, starting at 5am. I have done night shift packing bricks into a jig on an assembly line at a fast pace. Worked for a month on week off ‘swing’ in roof spaces banging ducting air conditioning together in a climate that is 40c plus every single day wearing full length safety clothing and breathing masks. I fixed residential ceilings and installed itchy batt insulation for years. Mixed mud for plasterers and eventually plastered walls myself, both render and white walling. I have worked as a real estate investment coach (Relationship Mgr) phoning leads when not in workshops/meetings with clients. Worked 60 hour weeks as a used car salesman. Worked on the mines (12h hour days) again in remote 40c + temperatures as a Reverse Circulation Drillers Offsider.

If it is a shitty testing job, I have done it. I am not afraid of hard work. My downfall has been searching for the golden bullet. I have worked online for the past 12 months and had little success. One positive is I am now aware I can find a solution and learn anything despite not being trained in using technology. I am consistent. Even when on holidays I still work on having a presence online. I have no doubt at all that I have the work ethic needed to persevere and take massive action.

What is your WHY? What drives & motivates you?

My why is family. They have never whinged or expressed frustration with doing it tough. Although I have worked my ass off over the years we have only ever ‘just got through’ There is always more month at the end of the money. A massive driver for me is being able to take the family out without having to add up the cost as we go, in case we ‘go over’ what we have budgeted for the night. Also being able to take my lovely fiance out for say a seafood dinner and not share a meal because we love that style of food but need to watch the pennies. Having security to not stress if we have an issue with our car or a major unexpected bill come in that we are able to sort it without shuffling funds or waiting for 2 weeks until our next payday. Another driver is not building someone else’s dreams, but putting time and effort into our future. When working as a Relationship Manager with property investors we would delve into their goals and use scare tactics to secure a commitment from them in regards to investing. We would make them aware of the fact that most of us aren’t prepared for an illness or loss of job. Or the fact that most us have enough super to live the life we desire for about 6-8 years, not the 25+ we may last. When leveraged to the hilt with no back up plan, we are a slave to ‘The Man’. I will have the peace of mind that if I am made redundant or if a family member needs my care I am able to support myself and family for a long long time. I strive to have a diverse range of residual/passive income. I will invest in property for both income and long term growth. One driver is to acquire commercial properties with nice long secure leases being paid. My fiance started a community based mobile App to warn fellow water users of sharks or closed beaches. I will start other projects such as this. Where the work is put in and once produced has the ability to feed income well after completion. Time freedom is probably the main driver for marketers and I am no different. To have the geographical freedom to work from ANYWHERE is something constantly on my mind. Life is very short, I feel strongly about being in a region of the world warm and appealing to enjoying the outdoors daily. whether it be exercising, playing sport, surfing, dining outdoors on a balmy night or any number of things. Even little things like having a private ensuite situated outdoors is an experience that has stayed with me since experiencing it at a flash hotel on the Gilli Islands in Indonesia. I will start a foundation or legacy to help the under privileged, with a focus on children. I feel strongly that far too many kids are living a hell on earth. Over 80,000 children go missing every year in India alone.

I do not want to struggle my life away, I want the life I truly believe my family and I deserve.

Multiple Choice Answer; Commitment- Pledging and obligating myself- Engaging my efforts long enough to see results.

Explanation;

I have fumbled about online for over 12 months now. I realise the importance of having guidance in most areas of our lives. Especially in starting an online business. I liken it to a young man or woman saying they will become a skilled electrician then NOT becoming an apprentice, but simply trying to ‘work it out’ themselves. This path would be ludicrous and to expect to gain the skills needed by not having guidance would be virtually impossible, and if it did happen I would guess it would take 100 times as long. I have chosen commitment because the desire to live a laptop lifestyle has consumed my being, it is something I think about a majority of my time awake, and perhaps asleep. I will not have it any other way. I will fire my boss within 18 months and my majority of income and focus will be on SFM/DEA’s systems.

 My ideal week.

Would entail a mix of producing daily vlogs and once during that week a substantial piece of video content that’s part of a series 90 mins long and full of value.  My assistant would do dictation for my written blogs perhaps 4 days a week upload and manage for me. I will meet with my team once a week & keep it fun and lively.
I will liaise with my investment broker about how our properties are performing and what investments are available. I will have contact with a project manager curating our charity projects both in remote Australia & overseas. Anna the kids and I will fly to Sydney for her latest movie premiere. We will stay 2 nights in a 5 star hotel overlooking Sydney Harbour with friendly staff available 24/7. We will charter a staffed yacht to cruise around the harbour. Also enjoy an afternoon shopping and exploring the city.
As a surprise for the family instead of an Uber to the airport to fly home the Concierge leads us up to the roof of the hotel. A large helicopter is waiting for us. We all chuckle with excitement and disbelief as the motors fire up & I feel a sense of major gratitude knowing the family are about to experience something most people would not is simply mind blowing. We enjoy flying low and at height over the city and beaches of Sydney for over an hour before heading to the airport once we are there we go through a private customs within the helicopter company. Then the family & I jump in a chartered vehicle which chauffeurs us to the flight.
My week is scheduled into 2/3 leisure 1/3 business, most is automated. The tasks that I am active in I thoroughly enjoy.
I am physically active 6 days a week and thoroughly enjoy a variety of fresh foods prepared on the spot and in bulk for convenience. Family time will dominate my leisure time.

The above was prepared for my mentors and is an essential step in establishing foundations. Mindset and being clear on your ‘why’ is vitally important. I would love to know your ‘why’ in the comments below. To go through these steps take free TEST DRIVE Start HERE

My Bucket List

The above was prepared for my mentors and is an essential step in establishing foundations. Mindset and being clear on your ‘why’ is vitally important. I would love to know your ‘why’ in the comments below. To go through these steps take free ‘test drive’ 
If you enjoyed this article & you believe others would benefit please share.
Ryan Billy Tate

Main Blog: RyanBillyTate.com

Six Figure Mentors Membership: Six Figure Mentors Elite+ Member

Online Sales Pro: VIP Member >Click Here For Demonstration Video<

About Ryan Billy Tate

>Click Here To Learn More About Ryan Billy Tate<

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